Toward a New Framework of Islamic Economic Analysis (2020)*

Main Article Content

Akhmad Akbar Susamto

Keywords

Abstract

Despite a profusion of literature, efforts to develop Islamic economics
as a discipline have not brought about anticipated results.
This paper argues that it is the absence of clarity on what would
make economics “Islamic” which impedes the development of
Islamic economics. To fill that absence, this paper proposes three
conditions under which an economics can be considered “Islamic”,
and then defines the scope of Islamic economics and its methods.
Finally, this paper suggests three implications which, taken
together, entail that developing Islamic economics and building
its body of knowledge is less complicated than was feared.


*This article was first published in the American Journal of Islam and Society 37, no. 1-2 (2020):
103-122

Abstract 272 | PDF Downloads 66

References

Endnotes
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